My August Blogging

Almost all of my blogging for August was on Stimpunks. That’s where my DEI, neurodiversity, and disability blogging will happen for now. boren.blog will be for SpIns, for personal news, and for toxic Christianity and Texas politics through my particular set of lenses.

Fostering healthy pluralism, which democracy demands, means confronting intolerance.

boren.blog

Stimpunks

Read more at Stimpunks.

August at Stimpunks: Our Blogging, Our Reading, Our Giving

In the Queue

  • We Long to Belong: In Search of Psychological Safety
  • Being Legible: Legibility as Social Status, Situational Privilege, and Belonging
  • Try Again: Mercy is Necessary to Learner Safety
  • Online Classes Are an Equity Requirement: If Opening Schools Is About Equity, Why Aren’t We Listening to Those Most Impacted?
  • Vestibular Issues with Parallax Scrolling and Transition Animations
  • Psychological Safety in Families
  • The Neurodivergent Experience in Josephmooon’s “So Far So Good”
  • It’s Not Rocket Science: Considering and Meeting the Sensory Needs of Autistic Children and Young People
  • Craft, Flow, and Cognitive Styles
  • Equity Versus Equality
  • It’s About Equity
  • Accessible, Equity Literate Care
  • Disability Dongles and Cultural Engagement
  • Wheelchair Flow Patrol
  • The Bipartisanship of Behaviorism
  • Practicing Pluralism: Minority Stress, Harm Reduction, and Triage
  • Accommodations and Emotional Bids in Neurodiverse Relationships
  • Taking Control of the Mask: Unmasking as a Spoiled Identity

My July Blogging

I split my writing between this blog and the Stimpunks blog. Stimpunks is a philanthropic LLC we started to house our Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging consulting as well as our direct giving to neurodivergent and disabled creators. More on Stimpunks later.

boren.blog

Stimpunks

We’re Emptying the Pews of Toxic Christianity

I was frightened by the religious right in its triumphant phase. But it turns out that the movement is just as dangerous in decline. Maybe more so.

If they can’t own the country, they’re ready to defile it.

White evangelicals once saw themselves “as the owners of mainstream American culture and morality and values,” said Jones. Now they are just another subculture.

From this fact derives much of our country’s cultural conflict. It helps explain not just the rise of Donald Trump, but also the growth of QAnon and even the escalating conflagration over critical race theory. “It’s hard to overstate the strength of this feeling, among white evangelicals in particular, of America being a white Christian country,” said Jones. “This sense of ownership of America just runs so deep in white evangelical circles.” The feeling that it’s slipping away has created an atmosphere of rage, resentment and paranoia.

QAnon is essentially a millenarian movement, with Trump taking the place of Jesus. Adherents dream of the coming of what they call the storm, when the enemies of the MAGA movement will be rounded up and executed, and Trump restored to his rightful place of leadership.

“It’s not unlike a belief in the second coming of Christ,” said Jones. “That at some point God will reorder society and set things right. I think that when a community feels itself in crisis, it does become more susceptible to conspiracy theories and other things that tell them that what they’re experiencing is not ultimately what’s going to happen.”

But the idea that public schools are corrupting children by leading them away from a providential understanding of American history has deep roots in white evangelical culture. And it was the Christian right that pioneered the tactic of trying to take over school boards in response to teachings seen as morally objectionable, whether that meant sex education, “secular humanism” or evolution.

As Jones notes, the Southern Baptist Convention was formed in 1845 after splitting with abolitionist Northern Baptists. He described it as a “remarkable arc”: a denomination founded on the defense of slavery “denouncing a critical read of history that might put a spotlight on that story.”

Source: Opinion | The Christian Right Is in Decline, and It’s Taking America With It – The New York Times

The backlash of decline underscores that decline. If there’s a good take to ongoing defilement, it’s that: We’re doing it! We’re emptying the pews of toxic Christianity.

Since 2006, white evangelical Protestants have experienced the most precipitous drop (of all groups) in affiliation, shrinking from 23% of Americans in 2006 to 14% in 2020.”

Source: The 2020 Census of American Religion – PRRI

These are our stories—of heartbreak and hope, terror and courage, rupture and reconciliation. We hope they’ll resonate with you in some way, whether you’re a believer, a former believer, or one of the increasing number of people raised without religion. Love it or hate it, America has begun to empty the pews. May this anthology help usher in a new sort of testimony.

Source: Stroop, Chrissy; O’Neal, Lauren. Empty the Pews: Stories of Leaving the Church (pp. 20-21). Epiphany Publishing. Kindle Edition.

#EmptyThePews points to the necessity of abandoning and confronting anti-democratic Christianity. Some religion embraces pluralism, but fundamentalism, in its intolerance, undermines pluralism, and white evangelical Protestantism is a variety of fundamentalism.

Source: If we want to save American democracy, we must have a very difficult conversation about evangelical Christianity | The Conversationalist

Previously on toxic Christianity,