Bathroom Bills, Neurodiversity, and Disability

My oldest, a baseball fan, coined the term “stallbatting”. Stallbatting is interfering with someone going to the bathroom of their choosing. Bathrooms can be anxious experiences for neurodivergent and disabled people who need assistance. Bathroom bills ratchet that anxiety by emboldening fear and hate. Unisex and family bathrooms are wonderful, and often scarce. We are left with assisting our opposite sex family, friends, and clients in binary gendered bathrooms, hoping nobody makes a fuss, hoping we can relieve ourselves in peace. Bathroom bills steal that peace. Bathroom bills hurt the disabled. Bathroom bills hurt the neurodivergent. Bathroom bills hurt my family and hurt my transgender friends and coworkers. Bathroom bills are incompatible with neurodiversity, the social model of disability, and the norms of work and collaboration.

Kids on the autism spectrum are seven times more likely to be gender non-conforming, adding an often overlooked element to this debate. Protecting LGBTQIA kids protects also neurodivergent kids—and vice versa. The fight is for inclusion and acceptance—for all operating systems, for all of our different ways of being human. Supporting our kids means supporting all of their possibilities and expressions.

Excerpted below is neurodivergent and disabled perspective on bathroom bills. Our lives are complicated enough without ableist intolerance getting between us and a bathroom.

And as many people with disabilities and caretakers can tell you, the right to safe and accessible public restrooms is also important for adults and older children who need accommodation, assistance, or supervision. It’s an issue that becomes especially difficult for people with disabilities who have caretakers of a different gender. Even without repressive state laws, discrimination and harassment against people with disabilities and their caretakers persists.

In North Carolina, however, people with disabilities and their caretakers risk being criminalized just for accessing a public bathroom.

This is thanks to North Carolina’s HB2. While most people are familiar with the way the bill discriminates against trans people, disability community activists have taken to the internet and protest to let lawmakers know that bathroom bills are a violation of many disabled people’s rights, too.

We can see this as one of many intersectional issues surrounding violence against, and the criminalization of, people with disabilities. Just yesterday, graphic news came from Japan that a man had murdered 19 people at a home for people with disabilities in a hate-motivated attack. And days after the shooting last week of a black behavioral health caretaker, Charles Kinsey, Miami police revealed that the officer who shot Kinsey was actually aiming for the patient he was caring for, Arnoldo Eliud Rios Soto, who has autism – as though this somehow made the sick abuse of police power better. It’s a fear that people of color and people with a number of disabilities, and their loved ones and caretakers, know too well: That innocent behavior will be stigmatized, and even fatal, for members of communities criminalized for who they are.

We can look toward bathroom bills as one of many pieces of legislation that reinforce the stigma people with disabilities – who are often marginalized in multiple ways – already face, criminalizing many people’s normal biological functions. These blatantly discriminatory bills have swept legislatures across the country as part of a wave of over 100 anti-LGBT bills. These laws mandate that trans people, and everybody, use the public restrooms of their “biological sex,” whatever the hell that means.

Source: Bathroom bills hurt people with disabilities

In March, North Carolina legislators passed a law barring trans people from bathrooms and locker rooms that do not match the gender on their birth certificates. For trans people with autism, who are often socially naïve and unaware of how they are perceived by others, such laws present a very real threat of the kind of confrontation they are ill-equipped to manage. Strang’s group works to help the children and teens in their program deal with such challenging situations. “We focus a lot on safety,” says Strang, “what it means to be trans in different types of communities.” Autism can create blind spots around those issues, he says, but he and his colleagues also recognize its gifts, such as intense focus and concentration.

Grobman too sees those aspects of autism as integral to her effectiveness as an activist. Her intense focus on trans and disability rights may be an obsession of sorts, she admits, but unlike her childhood preoccupation with the game Pokémon, this fixation is not trivial. Living with the threat of being bullied, assaulted or arrested for using the ‘wrong’ restroom generates near constant anxiety. Grobman says she feels driven to work for the kind of social change that will make the world a safer place for people like Ollie, Natalie, Jazzie and herself. “We need to create an understanding of the validity of trans experience and autistic experience,” Grobman says. “You are fighting for your own existence.”

Source: Living between genders | Spectrum

As a woman with a disability, I require assistance in the restroom. I have always required assistance in the restroom. When I was a child out in public with my single-parent father, using the restroom was always a tough issue to navigate. Family, or unisex, restrooms have only recently become more common.

Whenever I would go out with my father and I needed to use the restroom, he would have to sneak me into the men’s restroom, or I would have to sneak him into the women’s restroom. In extreme circumstances, we would need to ask one of the employees of the facility to put up a sign on the door to prevent people from entering.

Going into the opposite-sex restroom became the norm for us. It was either use the restroom or end our outing and return home.

I couldn’t help but find it entertaining when former Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz said that “the idea that grown men would be allowed alone in a bathroom with little girls” was unsafe. Why did I find it entertaining? Because that was my experience when I was a little girl. The only thing that happened to me was that I relieved my bladder.

Another type of relationship affected by the bill is the one between personal care attendants and the person being assisted. According to Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute, 89 percent of personal care attendants are female. The U.S. Census Bureau reports just over 17 percent of American men have a disability compared to almost 20 percent of women. This means that men with disabilities are more likely to get attendants who are women. What happens when a man with a disability is out with his female attendant and he needs to use the restroom? Does he hope that there is a family restroom nearby?

If we allow restrooms to be more fluid and accommodating for different life experiences, we include transgender people, people with disabilities who may require “unconventional” assistance and parents with young children. There are multiple ways of examining a social justice issue, and I encourage you to look beyond your personal experience and consider different walks of life.

Source: ‘Bathroom Bills’ Affect People with Disabilities | Paraquad

Anyone, who is caring for a seriously impaired person, who is his/her opposite gender, will also experience hardship from the passage and enforcement of segregated bathroom laws. I often think, when some nasty stranger feels compelled to judge, snark at me, or yell at my son, isn’t our life complicated enough? Perhaps we should instead get some understanding and help instead of dismissal and condemnation.

I’d say the same for what the vast majority of transgender people have endured their entire lives – the dismissal and cruel attacks. What ever happened to live and let live? Must so many people who are different dread something as fundamental as going to pee in a public restroom? Is it more a sign of the degradation of society, that we make exceptions to the rules of segregated restrooms for some people who are different or differently abled, or is the true degradation that the bigotry of some against “other” is so pervasive that we’re reduced now to making laws about where people urinate?

It is crucial to understand that passing strict gender segregation laws not only demeans and endangers our transgender brothers and sisters, but also puts severely disabled people with caretakers of the opposite gender in extreme danger in many cases.

Source: How do the new bathroom laws affect kids with special needs? / Page 3 / LGBTQ Nation

Although I may not be trans myself, I definitely have a vested interest in this issue. As a 33-year-old woman with a disability, I understand what it’s like to have limitations put on you by a little stick figure placard when you are at your most vulnerable – when your bowels and/or bladder are busting at the seams.

Not only could the appearance of more unisex and/or inclusive restrooms be a great solution for those targeted by the bathroom bill, but (on a purely selfish level) it would make my life a hell of a lot easier.

Aside from the concern of too-small stalls and sinks I can’t reach, public restrooms have always been my Achilles heel. I hate them with the passion of a thousand fiery suns.

When I was a teen, I would go to the movies and other events with my dad. If I happened to drink one too many Icees, I was – quite literally – up shit creek without a paddle. Unless we could find the rare unicorn that is the one-seater family restroom (which barely existed back then), there was no good option.

In lieu of driving me into a rage of teenage embarrassment by (GASP!) visiting the ladies’ room with dad in toe, I would just opt to hold it… often for several hours, and much to the detriment of my bladder. At the time, I didn’t feel comfortable going in a men’s room, and it would be weird to see a 6-foot-tall bald cis man hanging around outside a women’s room stall, right?

It’s frustrating, and even more so because I know I’m not alone in this awkward pee-pee waltz with propriety. Ask any cross-section of people with disabilities, and you will hear a choir of amens – and, likely, some amusing stories.

Inclusive restrooms could be a welcome respite for a huge population of people beyond just people like me and people who don’t identify with the gender they were assigned at birth.

These bathroom bill crusaders and self-appointed “morality police” probably haven’t considered what a game-changer Ally-McBeal-style bathrooms could be for caregivers of elderly relatives, parents of young people, and adults who, due to intellectual or behavioral disabilities, need assistance in the bathroom.

Source: Why This Cis Girl In A Wheelchair Cares About Bathroom Bills | Ravishly

Today, a father who took his disabled daughter into a men’s room in a public building in North Carolina technically would run afoul of the state’s so-called “bathroom bill,” which requires that people over the age of 7 use the bathroom that matches the sex on their birth certificates. While the law is aimed at transgender people, disability advocates worry that it also could affect people with disabilities who, because they need assistance from an opposite sex caregiver or parent, also use opposite sex bathrooms.

With restroom access a topic of national debate, many people with disabilities and their families are hoping that conversation extends to expanding access to public facilities for every person.

For many of the nearly one in five Americans (and about 5 percent of school-age children) with some disability, lack of access to public toilet facilities challenges their ability to take part in ordinary daily life. For some, like Ms. Serge, 46, who was born with cerebral palsy, the challenges are primarily physical.

Source: The Other Bathroom Wars – The New York Times

There’s also a deeper level to the debate swirling around restroom access, said historian Alice Dreger, author of “Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and One Scholar’s Search for Justice.” The need to fit into the world of gendered bathrooms and locker rooms is the justification doctors sometimes give for performing surgery on infants born with ambiguous genitalia. Doctors often guess a gender, she said, but it’s not always how the person ultimately identifies. These surgeries are dangerous and not easily reversible.

And what if, as one writer asked, you’re “an American with traditional views on gender, your kids are in a public school, and the girls’ locker room has just been declared a gender-fluid zone”? Indeed. What if it has been? That declaration was a long time coming, given that all locker rooms, and all of nature, have always been a gender-fluid zone.

So perhaps science can add something to the debate by showing where these restroom laws are not only hurtful but also unrealistic. Not everyone fits neatly into the categories of male and female, but everyone needs to go to the bathroom.

Source: Men’s Restroom or Women’s? Nature Is Never That Simple – Bloomberg View

Diversity & Inclusion Recap #2

In this issue,

  • Trans Autistic
  • Medical model flow
  • Embrace the obsession
  • Designing with mental health in mind
  • Minority Media
  • Psychological safety in the age of Trump
  • Disability in the age of Trump
  • Written communication as social equalizer
  • Hidden disability
  • Sensory Regulation, Sensory Diet
  • Biased design
  • Design, Engineering, Skills, and Social Justice
  • Self segregation
  • Empathy Gap and Critical Distance
  • Racial Wealth Gap
  • The Green Book, Erasure of Black History, School to Prison
  • Inspiration Porn
  • Bias at Work
  • Accessibility for Real Life

Trans Autistic

I added this selection from ASAN’s statement on the needs of trans autistic people to Neurodiversity and Gender Non-conformity, Dysphoria and Fluidity .

Misperceptions about what it means to be transgender or about autistic people’s ability to understand their gender or make decisions about their bodies often prompt service providers or family members to stand in the way of transgender autistic people’s attempts to live life with authenticity and dignity. This can include denying transgender autistic people access to transition-related care, subjecting them to “normalization” treatments aimed at suppressing their gender expression, or placing them in guardianship or institutional settings that restrict their decision-making power. While research suggests a large overlap between transgender and autistic communities, trans autistic people often lack access to services and supports that understand and respect all aspects of their identity.

“Too frequently, autistic people are denied basic rights to make decisions about our own bodies and health care, including when it comes to expressing our gender identity,” said Sam Crane, Legal Policy Director for the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network. “Whether we’re transgender or not, autistic people’s gender identities are as real as anyone else’s and should be respected and supported, not dismissed based on baseless stereotypes.”

Source: Autistic Self-Advocacy Network, LGBT Groups Release Statement on Needs of Trans Autistic People | Autistic Self Advocacy Network

I also added this selection.

“A common misconception is the assumption that gender and sexuality are irrelevant to autistic people, or that our sexuality and gender identities are symptoms of our autism,” said Bascom. “These beliefs are not only inaccurate but also profoundly harmful to autistic people and are often used to prevent autistic LGBT folks from accessing LGBT spaces, authentic relationships, and transition-related health care. The reality is that autistic people can have a beautiful diversity of gender identities and sexualities, and we have the same right to self-determination as anybody else.”

Source: How doctors’ offices and queer culture are failing autistic LGBTQ people.

Medical model flow

I’ve had a lot of exposure to the medical model and relate to these grafs.

“Yes, there are some who understand that my medical and mental health needs directly correlate to my gender and sexual identity, but it is not an easy thing to find,” said Rox Herrington, an autistic trans man. “It took me years to find doctors who understood how to relate to me, and there are still many times where I mention that I’m autistic and that I’m transgender that I will be immediately shut down.”

“As a genderqueer, nonbinary trans person, I’ve found that it is possible to find health care providers who are very competent with transgender/gender-nonconforming people, but they are highly unlikely to also be competent in working with autistic people in a non-pathologizing way,” said Lydia X.Z. Brown, chair of the Massachusetts Developmental Disabilities Council. “Likewise, most health care providers I might feel comfortable sharing about being autistic with, and who would be more likely to be more respectful and non-ableist, seem not to have much experience working alongside [transgender/gender-nonconforming] people.”

I am sorry to admit this pervasive ableism has too often informed the way I’ve interacted with autistic patients, LGBTQ or otherwise. Regardless of their gender or sexual identity, autistic and other disabled patients have every right to have those identities acknowledged by their medical providers. Everyone who delivers care to autistic patients should be sure they’re aware of the full person in front of them, not a preconceived notion of what they may or may not understand about themselves.

It was also dismaying to see how many people told me they don’t tell medical providers they are autistic because they fear being patronized or dismissed. Just as LGBTQ people should feel no inhibition from sharing information about themselves with their physicians, people with any kind of disability should be able to walk into a doctor’s office and feel confident they’re going to receive care that is respectful and meets their needs. Clearly the medical community has work to do when it comes to how we care for our autistic patients.

Source: How doctors’ offices and queer culture are failing autistic LGBTQ people.

Embrace the obsession

“Many of our study participants referred to their preferred interests as a ‘lifeline,’” said Kristie Patten Koenig of New York University who led the study published this week in the journal Occupational Therapy in Mental Health.

Overall, 92 percent of study participants said that their interest areas provide a calming effect for them.

What’s more, the vast majority — 86 percent — said they have a job or are in school or other training that’s related to their preferred area.

Of the adults studied, most reported that their interests were not static over time, with 68 percent saying that they have different preferences as adults than they did as youngsters.

While about half of those surveyed said that their parents were supportive of their intense interests, only 10 percent said their teachers were.

“This highlights an important gap in the educational practices of supporting students on the spectrum and the potential for incorporating their preferred interests in the classroom,” Koenig said.

Source: Study: For Those With Autism, Fixations Can Be Beneficial – Disability Scoop

For more on embracing obsession, see Advice to Teachers and Parents of Neurodivergent Kids from my primer on the social model for minds and bodies.

Designing with mental health in mind

With great examples of designing for real life.

For those who work in consumer products, for every company that hopes to serve a billion or more people, there is a challenge and responsibility to build products in a way that serves and supports customers who are the most vulnerable.

Another step we can take in supporting vulnerable customers is allowing them to choose their preferred form of communication.

While the high majority of our customer support is done through in-app chat, we are regularly in touch with our users via email or phone calls. However, for many people speaking on the phone is something that can cause great anxiety, or accessing emails isn’t straightforward, or perhaps they find the Intercom method of chat unusual.

Source: Monzo – Designing a product with mental health issues in mind

My autistic operating system particularly relates to this:

for many people speaking on the phone is something that can cause great anxiety

I’m an autistic parent trying to get my neurodivergent kids through systems that don’t accommodate us. A big barrier is the amount of spoken communication required to navigate hospitals, insurance companies, school systems, recreational sports leagues, and even agencies and institutions that claim to understand autism. If my wife wasn’t a high energy talker, we’d be doomed. “Phones, phones, phones” and “Call if you have a problem” are barriers.

Using the phone appears to be a challenge for many autistic people. All of the non-verbal cues which (we have tried to learn) aid communication — are stripped away. It’s just a voice.

As we use phones less and less in our social lives, I think it becomes even harder to communicate in this way. Every time I have discussed phones with other autistic women, we all describe high levels of anxiety around making and receiving phone calls. Screening calls seems to be common, as does silencing our phones, using caller display, and relying on our answer-phones. If we are expecting an important call, we will wait on tenterhooks, unable to do anything else until that phone call is complete.

Making phone calls is equally problematic. We plan what we need to say and adopt our ‘making a phone call’ persona, reminding ourselves of the conventions of making a phone call. We worry that the call will not be answered by the person we want, and have planned, to speak to. We dread having to explain the purpose of our call to a receptionist or some random person answering the phone. And what if it is an answer-phone? Before we make that call we prepare and rehearse numerous scripts for every conceivable possibility. Unfortunately, when an actual human answers, we are likely to forget the scripts and get in a muddle which sets the tone for the call.

Source: THINKING PERSON’S GUIDE TO AUTISM: Could Do Better: To Professionals Working with Autistic Mothers of Autistic Children

Aversion to phones is often used against us by placing phone requirements in cancellation flow.

Minority Media

This year, we saw more underrepresented groups being hired as writers, making media, and finding their voice. We’ve seen and felt their presence other platforms – black teens made culture on Vine, black women fueled worldwide movements like Black Lives Matter, and #BlackTwitter showed up making memes, vernacular, and blessing us with things like the Mannequin Challenge. That value cannot be understated, but it’s also not enough. As the death of Vine has shown us, simply being an individual creator on a platform isn’t always enough, since you’re at the behest of the powers that be – and those powers are mostly always white.

Despite hiring more minority writers, the power structure in legacy news organizations is still largely controlled by the same types of people. We need more Dodai Stewarts, Lydia Polgreens, and Elaine Welteroths leading editorial teams. We as an industry must invest in black women, Latina women, Muslim women, Asian women, Native American women, members of the LGBT community, and more.

Teen Vogue has shown us the way. Their incisive political coverage has shocked many who believe the magazine to only cover the best hairstyles or nail polish for teen girls, but after Welteroth took over as editor in May, Teen Vogue’s editorial strategy was steered to tackle the heady topics of racism, feminism, activism, and the rest of the -isms, covering these topics better than most traditional news organizations. They’ve demonstrated that when a black woman is in charge and gives younger women the room to write what they believe in, good things happen.

Source: The year of minority media » Nieman Journalism Lab

Psychological safety in the age of Trump

Disability in the age of Trump

For people with disabilities who are also from other marginalized populations, the dangers are heightened. Disabled people of color experience significant health disparities, have high unemployment rates, and are at heightened risk of being victims of violence and police brutality. Students of color with disabilities contend with discriminatory school discipline policies and an education system that reinforces the school-to-prison pipeline. These are only a few of the many examples of why we need an administration that understands the importance of intersectionality.

Moreover, students with disabilities aren’t truly given school choice: No choice exists if private schools can legally refuse to provide appropriate and necessary services and supports, which is often the case. In fact, generally, protections under federal laws such as the IDEA, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the Rehabilitation Act, do not extend to students with disabilities who attend private schools. In other words, private schools who do not receive federal funding have absolutely no legal duty to support students with disabilities.

Source: The Right to Learn, Earn, and Live: What Trump’s Cabinet Selections Mean for People With Disabilities – Rewire

Written communication as social equalizer

Where would I be without pervasive written communication? Pursuing the ability to communicate with text is the defining arc of my career.

Written communication is the great social equalizer.

Remember this if you start to fear your Autistic child is spending too much time interacting with others online and not enough time interacting with others face-to-face.  Online communication is a valid accommodation for the social disability that comes with being Autistic.  We need online interaction and this meta-study demonstrates exactly why that is the case.

I couldn’t help wondering, since the study showed the durability of first impressions and the positive response to the written words of Autistics, with all visual and auditory cues removed, could we mitigate childhood bullying in any way by having a class of students meet first online, in text, and form their first impressions of one another in that format before ever meeting face-to-face?

Getting online was revolutionary and may have saved my life.

But when I got online, no one could see (or smell) that about me. All they could see was my words and ideas, and that was what people judged me by. For the first time in my life, I was not found lacking. I made friends of all ages. I was respected and liked. The difference between offline and online communication could not have been more dramatic.

Source: THINKING PERSON’S GUIDE TO AUTISM: Autism and the Burden of Social Reciprocity

I added that quote to the Backchannels section of Communication is Oxygen and to a new Backchannels section of Writing in Education and Plain Text Flow.

Hidden disability

I often bring up the ableist action of harassing/accusing ambulatory wheelchair users (as well as scooter, walker, crutches, and cane users) of “faking” because it’s something that happens ALL the time under the guise of “allyship” that people seem to WANT to remain oblivious to.

A person standing up from a wheelchair or standing without their mobility aid SHOULD NOT be cause for alarm, should not inspire accusations of faking, should not inspire you to say, “it’s a miracle!” in a mocking tone, or to ask me if I should “really be parked here”, or recommendations of weight loss so I won’t “need that chair anymore”, or whispering about how my karma is coming or how I’m going to hell for “playing with a wheelchair”; all comments I’ve received from strangers for just standing in public, getting my chair out of the trunk of my car on my own, or doing something as minimal as riding my chair while being young and smiling.

It’s prejudice; it lacks understanding to how diverse disability is, it uses a singular representation of wheelchair users to judge all wheelchair users. When people are called out on that ableism, those who do it will become defensive and claim to be acting in defense of disabled people because they truly deeply believe in the myth of a “faking disability epidemic”, but hear this: non-apparent disabilities/invisible disablities, etc. are REAL disabilities and you are harassing the very people you are claiming to be advocating for.

Source: Annie Elainey – Standing Up From My Wheelchair in Public – Standing Up From My Wheelchair in Public

I added this to Hidden Disability.

Sensory Regulation, Sensory Diet

Sensory regulation and sensory diet are important to knowing and managing my limits.

To live more comfortably in a world that is not set up with our sensory needs in mind we must learn to brings intentional regulation to our sensory system because out body does not do that for us automatically.

Something about autistic sensory difference that I do not see addressed in the literature is the fact that sensory system needs change over time.

However, over time, implementing the very same sensory regulating strategies doesn’t keep on delivering the same results. This is because the sensory system needs change over time (Endow, 2011).

It is important for autistic adults to be aware of the fact that their sensory needs will likely change over time. When you think of it, it makes sense because all human beings experience this. When you are autistic and have a very sensitive system that does not often regulate automatically you need to be aware of this possibility and watch for the changes.

Source: ‘Autism and A Changing Sensory System” by Judy Endow, MSW

Biased design

A biased, unethical design choice.

Design, Engineering, Skills, and Social Justice

Glad to see social justice as part of Girls Garage pedagogy.

We offer year-round instruction for girls to bring their audacious ideas to life.

After-school, over the summer, or on weekends, girls can work towards their 10-module Fearless Builder Girl certification and earn skill badges along the way. Integrating design, engineering, serious skills and social justice, our programs equip girls with the confidence and tools to build anything they can imagine and to grow alongside one another and their communities.

Source: Programs – Girls Garage

There is no path toward educational justice that contains convenient detours around direct confrontations with injustice. The desperate search for these detours, often in the form of models or frameworks or concepts that were not developed as paths to justice, is the greatest evidence of the collective desire among those who count on injustice to give them an advantage to retain that advantage. If a direct confrontation of injustice is missing from our strategies or initiatives or movements, that means we are recreating the conditions we’re pretending to want to destroy.

Source: Paul C. Gorski – Grit. Growth mindset. Emotional intelligence….

Self segregation

As a tool maker in the tech world, I’m feeling this one.

Many in the tech world imagined that the Internet would connect people in unprecedented ways, allow for divisions to be bridged and wounds to heal. It was the kumbaya dream. Today, those same dreamers find it quite unsettling to watch as the tools that were designed to bring people together are used by people to magnify divisions and undermine social solidarity. These tools were built in a bubble, and that bubble has burst.

The United States can only function as a healthy democracy if we find a healthy way to diversify our social connections, if we find a way to weave together a strong social fabric that bridges ties across difference.

Source: Why America is Self-Segregating

When we engage in the commons and diversify our connections, we create serendipity.

Empathy Gap and Critical Distance

Although there has been more and more discussion about the lack of diversity in tech, I believe there is still a startling empathy gap as most people do not realize the sheer amount of energy minorities expend trying to belong. The ideal solution is simply to have companies that are diverse, so that no one feels out of place and everyone can thrive.

As a first step, our white, male-dominated industry needs to recognize the real struggle that underrepresented groups face and start driving conversations and actions to create a more empathetic and inclusive workplace. Without such empathy, most companies will continue to fail to achieve true organizational buy-in and won’t be able to take the necessary actions to attract, retain, or get the best work from people who come from underrepresented backgrounds. We can all contribute to finding solutions, but many people in tech don’t bother looking for those solutions because they fail to see the problem in the first place.

Source: Jules Walter on Diversity in Tech: The Unspoken Empathy Gap | Design.blog

Critical distance is necessary not just to critical thinking, but to empathy.

Marginal people are those who are the dominant culture to some extent but are blocked from full participation because of their social status. One need not be a marginal person to be a sociologist, but marginality has often provided the critical distance necessary to inspire a thriving sociological imagination.

Source: Sociology: Understanding a Diverse Society

Racial Wealth Gap

https://twitter.com/rmc031/status/828824135413399553

Research probing the causes of the racial wealth gap has traced its origins to historic injustices, from slavery to segregation to redlining.1 The great expansion of wealth in the years after World War II was fueled by public policies such as the GI Bill, which mostly helped white veterans attend college and purchase homes with guaranteed mortgages, building the foundations of an American middle class that largely excluded people of color. The outcomes of past injustice are carried forward as wealth is handed down across generations and are reinforced by ostensibly “color-blind” practices and policies in effect today. Yet many popular explanations for racial economic inequality overlook these deep roots, asserting that wealth disparities must be solely the result of individual life choices and personal achievements. The misconception that personal responsibility accounts for the racial wealth gap is an obstacle to the policies that could effectively address racial disparities.

Source: The Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap

Get structural.

The Green Book, Erasure of Black History, School to Prison

Our collective lack of knowledge around many black heroes and heroines can also be attributed to the fact that we continue to rely on our nation’s school systems to educate us—the same systems that we are fighting against to make sure that slavery isn’t referred to as “unpaid work” and that our children aren’t stuck in the school-to-prison pipeline. Our collective lack of knowledge around many black heroes and heroines can also be attributed to the fact that we continue to rely on our nation’s school systems to educate us—the same systems that we are fighting against to make sure that slavery isn’t referred to as “unpaid work” and that our children aren’t stuck in the school-to-prison pipeline.

Source: The ‘Green Book’ Was a Travel Guide Just for Black Motorists – NBC News

Inspiration Porn

Media coverage of disability is often informed by some of our worst ideas about difference. Coverage of disability tends to be pornographic - not in the sense of sexual titillation (mostly), but focused on evoking feelings in the consumer, rather than authentically displaying the lived experience of the subject. In the disability rights community, we tend to critique suchrepresentations as “inspiration porn,” a phrase popularized by the late activist Stella Young.

There are at least three basic types of inspiration porn. In one, a disabled person does something normal - like dance to Lady Gaga - and the viewer feels inspired because the disabled person can do this normal thing. Look at them overcome their disability! the narrative goes. This framework cheapens real accomplishments and rarely considers the socially-constructed obstacles to broad success for people with disabilities.

In the second type, an abled person does some basic act of kindness - such as having lunch with an autistic kidisolated at school, stopping work to feed a disabled customer at a restaurant, or inviting a disabled teen on a date. The abled person is then celebrated for their goodness, with the disabled person turned into an object on which the able person acts. Again, structural issues leading to the need for abled intervention vanish.

In the third type, often distinguished as “tragedy porn,” a horrible situation involving a disabled person is displayed, sometimes with comments about overcoming or courage, with the goal of providing perspective on your own (presumably not as bad) troubles. Perspective can be good, but again, the disabled person’s experiences are being leveraged as a tool to make the viewer feel something.

Cuteness is a way of aestheticizing powerlessness.” Many disabled adults, especially those with Down syndrome and Little People, are treated as perpetually cute children.

Because disability is a part of humanity’s natural diversity, it needs to be part of the important conversations we’re having about inclusivity.

Disability as identity and disability pride may be familiar concepts within the disability rights community, but they’re still pretty radical for the ableist world as a whole.

Source: Don’t Turn My Son’s Lady Gaga Dancing Into Your Inspiration Porn

I updated Inspiration Porn, Growth Mindset, and Deficit Ideologywith these quotes.

Bias at Work

The bottom line is that patterns of unchecked biased and offensive behavior in the workplace have the potential to erode full employee participation and take a toll on organizational effectiveness.

Given the risks and challenges, how can you draw attention to the bias or offensiveness without putting the other person on the defensive? What are some approaches most likely to limit unintended adverse consequences?

Source: How to Speak Up If You See Bias at Work

Accessibility for Real Life

Here’s what I bring to the table: a valid credit card, 90 seconds of my time, and my right thumb. The rest is up to you

Make your content awesome, so I don’t have to be: I’m nearsighted and I just turned 40, so the other end of my vision is starting to go, too. I could jack up my font, but I literally don’t have time to wade through the settings menu. I’m probably squinting at a site at 4 am, hoping the headings and navigation are crystal clear, and that the first paragraph of text tells me no poop in five days is perfectly normal and I’m doing a great job.

Inclusive design and a great user experience used to be luxuries for me—now I understand how essential they are, especially for folks whose abilities and capacity are different from mine. Users really are relying on you and your team to create sites and apps that make their lives easier.

Source: 8 things parenting taught me about accessibility » Simply Accessible

GenderMag and Cognitive Walkthroughs

GenderMag focuses on five facets of gender differences that have been extensively investigated in the literature pertaining to problem solving. It encapsulates them into a set of faceted personas to bring them to life, and embeds their use into a systematic process based on a gender specialization of the Cognitive Walkthrough (CW) [59, 63]. The five facets are:

Motivation: Research spanning over a decade has found that females tend (statistically) to be motivated to use technology for what they can accomplish with it, whereas males are often motivated by their enjoyment of technology per se [12, 13, 19, 31, 33, 37, 43, 57]. This difference can affect which software features users choose to use.

Information processing styles: To solve problems, people often need to process new information. Females are more likely (statistically) to process new information comprehensively-gathering fairly complete information before proceeding-but males are more likely to use selective styles-following the first promising information, then backtracking if needed [17, 22, 45, 46, 52]. Each style has advantages, but either is at a disadvantage when not supported by the software.

Computer self-efficacy: Self-efficacy is a person’s confidence about succeeding at a specific task, and influences their use of cognitive strategies, persistence, and strategies for coping with obstacles [3]. Empirical data have shown that females often have lower computer selfefficacy than males, and this can affect their behavior with technology [5, 6, 12, 13, 24, 32, 34, 43, 49, 50, 58].

Risk aversion: Research shows that females tend statistically to be more risk-averse than males [23], surveyed in [62], and meta-analyzed in [21]. These results span numerous decision-making domains, such as in ethical decisions, investment decisions, gambling decisions, health/safety decisions, career decisions, and others. Risk aversion with software usage can impact users’ decisions as to which feature sets to use.

Tinkering: Research across age groups and professions reports females being statistically less likely to playfully experiment (“tinker”) with software features new to them, compared to males. However, when females do tinker, they tend to be more likely to reflect during the process and thereby sometimes profit from it more than males do [6, 13, 18, 20, 33, 54].

Source: Finding Gender-Inclusiveness Software Issues with GenderMag: A Field Investigation

Cognitive Walkthroughs focus on just one attribute of usability, ease of learning.

Cognitive walkthroughs evaluate each step necessary to perform a task, attempting to uncover design errors that would interfere with learning by exploration. The method finds mismatches between users’ and designers’ conceptualization of a task.

The procedure uncovers explicit and implicit assumptions made by developers about users’ knowledge of the task and interface conventions. The evaluation procedure takes the form of a series of questions asked about each step in a task that are derived from a theory of learning by exploration.

Source: The Cognitive Walkthrough Method: A Practitioner’s Guide

Per the researchers, the five facets of the GenderMag method are backed by extensive empirical and theoretical work. Facets backed by at least 5 independent empirical studies were chosen, with some having 10 or 15. The majority of studies favor US populations and all are based on adults. Children are excluded from claims.

They realized that, really, it’s all about the facets. It’s not really about gender. It’s all about the facet values and being inclusive across the range of facet values.

I’m channeling Abby, and I do not like this software.

Source: Finding Gender-Inclusiveness Software Issues with GenderMag: A Field Investigation – YouTube